On a Slow Boat to Dubrovnik

During the summer months, Jadrolinija runs a coastal ferry service from Rijeka in the north to Dubrovnik in the south, taking all night and all day about it. Calling in at Split, Stari Grad on Hvar, then Korčula and Mljet, until quite recently the route also included Bari in Italy. Going further back into the…

Sućuraj – Hvar eastern travel

At the eastern tip of Hvar lies the pretty little port of Sućuraj. From there, it’s only 5 km, a short hop by ferry across to Drvenik on the mainland. From the island the effect is rather dramatic – you’re looking up at a 4,000 ft wall across the small channel, which looms ever larger…

Vrboska by Night

Walking around Vrboska at night is delightful, if a bit tricky in places. We have street lights that kind of cover most areas, but some familiarity with the pathways definitely helps for those darker corners! Of course, the most important buildings are always floodlit throughout the night – so the churches of Sv Marija and…

House in Prapatna

Reflections on Prapatna

When we first started looking at properties on Hvar, one of the houses that really caught my imagination was in Prapatna. It was a gorgeous stone house with walled garden, right on the seafront. Sure, it needed a bit of work, but boy, what a stunning location! In the end, because the practicalities of life…

Vrboska upper harbour and bri

Up with the sun in Vrboska

I really enjoy getting up early in Vrboska, especially on a sunny day. Even with the grilles on our shutters firmly closed,  I can still tell that the sun is about to appear and it’s time to be out and about. From the top floor of our house, we have a view of the sunrise…

Humac ruins with view over Brac

Humac – amongst the ruins at sunset

You might think that Humac is a deserted village, but appearances are misleading. This is a seasonal village, where people from Vrisnik could be close to additional fields and grazing. Most of the houses now look fairly run-down, if not actually derelict, but here and there you can see signs of recent activity. And, of…

Massive walls at Purkin Kuk

Purkin Kuk – a prehistoric hillfort

Following my previous blog on Hvar’s drystone walls, I’m moving backwards in time beyond the Greek colonists to the Illyrians, who lived here before them. Between 2,000 and 1,000 B.C. the population began to settle on hilltops. Their huts were defended by ditches and stone ramparts some of which were massive. One of these hilltop…